The kinds of people that impress me

The kinds of people that impress me are the ones who pick up the piece of toilet paper they dropped on the floor even when a toilet attendant is right beside them…

because they believe that if they mess something up, it is their responsibility to clean it up.

The kinds of people that impress me are the ones who stay behind after everyone has left the office, library, or meeting room to go over everything “one last time” in case they might have overlooked something….

because they believe not just in delivering to deadlines but delivering excellence.

The kinds of people who impress me are the ones who make their own beds and clean their own room even when someone else will do it for them…

because they believe in taking ownership of and responsibility for their own things.

The kinds of people who impress me are the customers who point out tactfully to a barista that the coffee is not up to par, and the baristas who key in a wrong beverage as their own employee drink to replace an order that did not meet the standard…

because they believe that businesses (and the people who run them) should deliver what they promise.

The kinds of people who impress me are the ones who say “I’ll fork out the money for this first if it will take too long to get budget clearance so we can finish this project on time”…

because they are willing to make small sacrifices to accomplish a bigger goal.

The kind of people who impress me are the ones who go outside their scope of work or responsibility just to make someone else’s a little easier or more meaningful…

because they believe that when they benefit those around them, they benefit themselves.

The kinds of people who impress me are the ones who just get on with what needs to be done even if they don’t get the credit for it…

because their satisfaction comes from personal and internal, rather than external recognition.

The kinds of people who impress me are the ones whom I look up to for inspiration, respect tremendously, and aspire to emulate.

What sort of people impress you?

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Making goal-setting sexy

This post is a response to Danielle LaPorte’s brilliant ‘The Burning Question‘ series. 

I want waking up to feel like fresh brewed coffee and a morning dip.

I want holding hands to feel like springtime in Paris.

I want coffee dates to feel like Rachael Yamagata.

I want Liverpool to feel like achieving first class honours.

I want my friendships to feel like Jason Mraz, home-baked goodies, road trips, and late-night talks at sleepovers.

I want learning to feel like my first plane ride, and understanding to feel like watching the sun rise above a sea of clouds below me.

I want exploring to feel like Owl City.

I want my body to feel like Sarah Walker kicking butt.

I want making money to feel the way a farmer feels when he surveys the fruit of his labour at harvest time.

I want family to feel like homemade ikan bilis pan mee, tent blankets, and torchlight shadow animals.

I want challenges to feel like Original Bootcamp and climbing Mount Kinabalu.

I want sleep to feel like Port Blue and bobbing on waves.

I want smiling to feel like dipping my toes into the sea and Colbie Caillat.

I want kissing to feel like deep, dark chocolate.

I want helping others to feel like muddy paws and enthusiastic, drool-filled licks.

I want my dream job to feel like walking through IKEA, the smell of new books, the whir of a coffee grinder, and a whiteboard + chalkboard covered with mindmaps in coloured ink and chalk.

I want my writing to feel like an old library with a roaring fireplace and hot tea, lovers sharing a dilapidated apartment in a gritty neighbourhood, and watching a beach sunrise.

I want love to feel like coming home after a long journey.

Feelings are magnetic. So it goes that if you generate certain feelings — and you have the power to create any feeling you desire — then you increase the power of your emotional magnetism. But we need to limber up, loosen the images and adjectives encrusted on our goals and most-desired states. It helps to get poetic, lyrical, and abstract. -Danielle LaPorte